connecting things worth reading

school covers all subjects, but simplifies

college focuses on one

so worldviews miss nuance or are outdated

revisit it all via surprises and sources

in a sleek memo twice a month

discover overlap niches to work in

What kinds of connections?

The entire sample memo is freely available. Topics of some other memos:

Of course Economics is a science. Just as nutrition research is. No seriously, it really is like nutrition advice!

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The talk to have after watching Harry Potter or King Kong, and the range of areas where that insight can be applied.

What connects Jerry Maguire, the Trump Administration,  Goldman Sachs, the Nature journal, the IMF and more?

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Yes, ants colonies are highly organised and protected with sophisticated weapons. But in how many others ways are ant societies similar to complex human civilization?

Whether second-language learner or native speaker, English has words seemingly designed to throw you off.

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Fictional CGI planets in the most expensive Hollywood films are no match for your very own earth. Wait till you read what forest-wide networks are capable of!

Sample memo worth half a coffee? Snippets above intriguing?

ABOUT

Why read a little bit of everything?

Why connect new things?

The inter’angle memo is published twice a month. It is far more than a newsletter or aggregator: every issue tries to present new angles for looking at the world, across a wide range of topics.

It is aimed at anyone who is curious and wants to understand more and better. It can also serve students writing applications, journalists writing pitches, researchers writing proposals and writers – anyone who needs to come up with new things worth pursuing – in short, you!

Schools cover a broad range of subjects because the basics are considered relevant to all careers. But schools simplify for young minds. College cannot update it all because the focus is narrow by definition. But even the basics are more nuanced than school taught, not to mention the updates to human knowledge over the decades since you were at school. This memo offers the necessary  corrective.

Its main features are explained on the right (or below on mobile). The snippets above and below give an indication of the range of topics (economics, language, science, geopolitics, maths, films, history, art, health, innovation and more).

But tweets have a character limit. Really the best way to get a feel for what you’ll be getting is to read a sample memo.

Discover

For anyone about to apply to a school or job, write an article pitch or research proposal, new ideas are how you will set yourself apart. The more you read, the wider your horizon is, the sooner you will get that one original idea. But there’s no time to read it all! If you only have a few hours a week for calm retentive reading, wish you had hand-picked links to spend that time on?

connect

And it’s not just what and how much to read, but why something is worth the time. The memo will often put side by side, two things that you might otherwise not have. Because they might be from different times, different topics, different countries or simply not at all analogous at first glance. If something connects to other stuff in surprising ways, it is worth more of your time. Creativity thrives on making new links between seemingly unrelated ideas.

unlearn

The memo will also consistently try to show that the world is not what it seems and hence, more interesting and more complex than it appeared yesterday. One month, the memo may contain stunning facts about a business or animal; in a few months, it will show that even that was not the complete picture. That’s the second ‘why’.

Go on, read the first few memos. See if you can resist the next ones.

Cool mini connects

Even within 140 characters @microangling has been at it for years!

Whole year at the price of a cheap book – why miss another issue?

© 2018 Wrytten Research Media OPC